Valley Behavioral HealthValley Behavioral Health

By Cassie

CORE for Women

Cassie, a CORE client

After being in Federal Prison for 9 years, I came to Salt Lake City and was institutionalized and felt lost. I have Bi-Polar and manic-depressive disorder and a boyfriend that I had at the time, was very controlling. He convinced me to stop taking my medications, put me in high-risk situations where I began to spiral downward, mentally losing myself and becoming more and more psychotic. Eventually, I relapsed and returned to using Meth and drinking daily. I went from having a nice home with him to living in my car and on the streets. I lost my job because I was self-medicating. I was in trouble with federal probation and was placed in mental health court. I admitted to using and that I needed more help. Counseling was not enough. I could not do it on my own. I was suffering from such bad depression, anxiety and having bad manic episodes. They arrested me and I was put in jail for my own safety after my relapse.

That is when Cami, case manager, came to the jail and screened me for the CORE for Women program. I was the first client in this new program. I came in with an open mind to find myself again and it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. CORE for Women gave me structure and a chance to find myself again. With the classes, therapy, medications, and case management, I learned to stay sober and love myself again. I was able to discover more about my mental illness and how it affects my life. I was made a new person. I successfully graduated Federal Mental Health Court and am now off Federal Probation. I have been sober for 10 months. Now, I am a graduate of the program. I have my own apartment, a job, a car and I’m involved with CORE Recovery Management and Addicts to Athletes. I enjoy coming to CORE and taking the clients to play baseball and being a Peer Support Specialist. I’d like to go to school to become a veterinary technician. I love myself and my new life thanks to the Valley Behavioral Health CORE program.

Now, I am a graduate of the program. I have my own apartment, a job, a car and I’m involved with CORE Recovery Management and Addicts to Athletes. I enjoy coming to CORE and taking the clients to play baseball and being a Peer Support Specialist. I’d like to go to school to become a veterinary technician. I love myself and my new life thanks to the Valley Behavioral Health CORE for Women program.

 

 

 

 

 

By Phillip Tso

A Story From One of Our Own…

Phillip Tso, a CORE client

Below is a testimonial from a CORE client.

My name is Phillip Tso. I am a 31-year-old male who was mentally and emotionally sick from a very young age. I started using drugs at the age of 11 and was diagnosed at the age of 14 with numerous mental illnesses. I have been in and out of jail numerous times from the age of 18 until the age of 21. At that time, I expressed to my judge through my LDA that I was sick of being homeless, being dependent on drugs and didn’t have hope ahead of me. At this point, I made the decision to come to the CORE unit. Upon arrival I was lost, broken and lonely. Through my time and help from CORE, I have found myself and my purpose once more. I no longer feel broken and have many great friends and wonderful relationships with my family and loved ones. Thanks to this program, I have hope and a great future ahead of me.”

Below is what Philip’s case manager had to say about him.

By Gary Larcenaire, CEO & President

Creating Success Through the Instillation of HOPE…

Gary Larcenaire, CEO Valley Behavioral Health

 

Each year, the population in Utah’s prisons is growing.  In November of 2014, total inmates in prison have increased by 18% since 2004. It is expected that there will be a 37% growth rate by 2032. That is an increase of 2,700 inmates. As of 2014, of those released, 46% will return within three years[1]. While this is a large problem to tackle, here at Valley Behavioral Health we aim to be part of the solution.

C.O.R.E – Co-occurring Reentry & Empowerment, is one of the many programs offered by Valley Behavioral Health.  CORE offers services for those who are criminal offenders with a history of mental health and substance abuse disorder. We work with our clients on skills and development while in residential support. The program establishes a strong connection between law enforcement, the courts and correctional departments, to ensure coordination of these services for those individuals. Most of these individuals come from a lack of support system with years of incarceration, homelessness and dual diagnosis.

Our CORE program is a volunteer program, unlike others that are court order. This has created a long waiting list which is currently at 70 people. Our services include two 16-bed residential facilities; one for men and one for women. There are 32 active clients in recovery management, all of them are housed safely in these unlocked facilities – with the average length of stay being 4 -6 months.

At CORE we regularly have 20 – 26 graduates yearly for the residential program and 4-8 graduates for Recovery Management.

Why is CORE successful? CORE offers wrap-around services that are both onsite and in the community. We use a mental health approach with the ultimate goal of successful reentry into the community and a reduction in recidivism. This is achieved by improving positive emotional functioning and promoting accountability. Clients also receive Alcohol and Drug treatment at our Forensics outpatient facility.

In short, CORE offers clients a safe place to integrate back into society, a place they are empowered daily to move forward in a positive direction.  The unlocked facility gives them a sense of achievement as they overcome the many obstacles they face each day.  CORE is a support network of many community partners as well as peer support making a better world.

For more information, watch a story that our local news station, KSL produced on our CORE program here.

 

Sincerely,

Gary Larcenaire

CEO, Valley Behavioral Health

 

[1] “Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice” (2014, November). Retrieved from https://dsamh.utah.gov/pdf/Justice_Reinvestment_Report_2014.pdf